Monday, December 6, 2010

There's a Rumor Going Round...

Rumor has it that the Impressionists didn't like or use black. Ah ha, it's rather easy to squash that particular bit of gossip. Simply look at almost any Manet.
Hmmm, what's that? You say Manet wasn't really an Impressionist? Okay, you have a point. But of course, Degas and Caillebotte were surely Impressionists with a capitol "I." And they used black a lot.
Okay, okay. You're right. They used black when painting people and manmade things like buildings and hardwood floors, stockbrokers and ballerinas. Perhaps, as you say, black for these kinds of things would be a special exception to any rule.
But Monet, Claude Monet, the primo Impressionist, sometimes used black as well and used it for landscapes! Ah yes, though many beautiful Impressionist landscapes haven't a stroke of black, others surely do.
Lots of my landscapes haven't any black either; but some do, like Junk Trees above. It's a 12x9 plein air of a much-maligned species, the hackberry tree. Hackberries grow fast and grow just about everywhere in Middle Tennessee. They're not "good" for anything like building or burning so they only rate as junk, though beautiful junk.

15 comments:

  1. Je pense que dans votre peinture cette touche de noir a permis de donner de la profondeur à votre toile. Tout est en légèreté et j'aime ça... Tout comme le micocouliers qui poussent dans notre région méridionale et que j'affectionne.
    Vos couleurs chantent bien ensemble.
    Bravo,
    Bisous

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  2. I could just roll around in these colors and wrap myself up in them like a blanket....stunning! the black is just edgy enough...

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  3. Thank you all. I do think the trees needed that black. Martine, I so wish I could read French!

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  4. Love the work! You made hackberries look so beautiful! I believe hackberries were the bradford pear of older days. They grow quickly to leaf out a neighborhood under development - - at least that's what I've read a lot. They are ALL over my neighborhood which was subdivided in 1910 and many of them are really lovely and have interesting shapes too! Thank you, Shirley - - I so look forward to your blog! Denise

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  5. Thank you so much, Denise. Another hackberry appreciator! As a hackberry ages, it just gets more character. Wish I could say the same for our Bradford Pears.

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  6. My personal feeling is that it doesn't matter what colors we use, as along as we paint!

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  7. I love the softness of the colors and the black is the perfect accent.

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  8. Thank you Lee. The softness I think needed a bit of black edginess!

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  9. I agree junk is often beautiful. The colours in this are perfect.

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  10. Thank you Nicky. As they say, one man's junk...

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  11. Ahhh yes the beauty in junk ♥ great post and love the painting :)

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  12. Hackberry trees. Keyword: TREES. Black, orange or purple, they're precious beings. Always moving. I also love the wonderfully subtle movement in your paintings.

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  13. Thanks Sam and Ivy. Glad you like the painting.

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