Tuesday, January 31, 2012

"The Tenderness of Youth"


The Tenderness of Youth is an open studio 14x14 oil by Shirley Fachilla.

The first Renaissance portraits were posed in profile. Frequently, the subjects were the very young. They were often quite literally Romeos and Juliets with their likenesses done to show a prince his potential bride (or more rarely a princess her possible husband), and sometimes sadly, to commemorate a young death.

One of my favorite places in the Metropolitan Museum of Art is the gallery that contains many of these Renaissance teenagers.  It’s a wonderful room for the study of interesting painting techniques, but that’s not why I love the place. 

When I first took a real look around, it was a case of déjà vu; the painted faces were so like the faces of my daughter’s teenage friends. The clothes, of course, were different; but the faces were the same, tender innocent profiles, expectant and beautiful, now and more than five hundred years ago. 

11 comments:

  1. This is so beautiful. Funny, tenderness was the first word that popped into my mind.
    I accidentally deleted the comment you left on my blog...Seated Figure. I have a new ipad. I'm not sure how I deleted it.

    ReplyDelete
  2. What gorgeous examples in the links you chose! I will be keeping my eye out for more of this genre as I walk through painting history!

    Your painting is an absolute success! Beautiful edge work, skin tones and hair! I also like her camisole!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Wow! Gorgeous portrait! Great expression and great light. Lovely!

    ReplyDelete
  4. An interesting observation, Shirley, and somehow hopeful! This is a lovely, delicate work. Love the lighting around her face.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Lovely painting and perceptive comments, Shirley.

    ReplyDelete
  6. This is a beautiful sensitive portrait. I love the lighting and the positioning on the canvas.

    ReplyDelete
  7. This is a very tender profile. What facial feature makes it so, I wonder. Or is it proportion? Beautiful

    ReplyDelete
  8. Shirley, this is so sensitively painted, it's beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
  9. I don't know if you go back and check comments on previous posts, but if you do, you'll see that this particular painting kept calling me back until I had to say how wonderful I think it is. Very tender, indeed. Well-named and so well-painted. Sweet.

    ReplyDelete

Strolling from Paris to the Salmagundi!

A Stroll Beside the Louvre by Shirley Fachilla This little trio should be arriving at The Salmagundi Club in NYC any day now. It’s ...